Sunday, March 21, 2010



Aquarium Fish Health: White Spot Disease Symptoms And Cures

Posted: 21 Mar 2010 02:05 AM PDT

Aquarium Fish Health: White Spot Disease Symptoms And Cures
by: Nathan Miller

Fish death is one of the main problems that beginner aquarist and even some expert aquarist face. It's frustrating to the extent that most quit keeping aquarium fish.

But fish death can be avoided. Most fish deaths are caused as a result of both an internal and external types parasites that compete with the fish in tank.

As a result if you watch your aquarium fish often you should be able to discover when they have been infected by this parasite and be able to treat them to avoid fish death.

Look out for the following White Spot disease behavioral symptoms in your fish.

- Constant lying on the bottom or hanging at the surface.

- Rubbing of the body against rocks

- Gasping at the water surface

- No response to feeding

- General dullness and lethargy

- Hovering in a corner

- Fish swimming with clamps up

The most common of the visible signs is the development of the pin head-size while spots on the body or fins. This ailment is referred to as White Spot disease and is caused by the parasite - Ichthyophthirius Multifillis.

This parasite has a free-swimming stage, which attaches itself to the fish. The most common chemical used in treating infected fishes is Methylene Blue. You could buy a one per cent stock solution from a reputable chemist or aquarium shop and apply at 0.8 to 1.0ml per gallon of water. This amount should be added all at once. Repeat after one or two days.

The fishes must remain in this bath until every while spot has disappeared. A water change after treatment is necessary or else prolonged contact with the chemical may affect the fertility of the fish.

Another tip if you are using a side filter with activated charcoal should remove it to prevent the coal from absorbing the Methylene Blue.

Another tip... during treatment you should use artificial aeration with coarse bubbles near the surface, since a dirty bottom would inactivate the medicament by absorption. A better measure is to remove all dirt from the bottom before treatment.

Methylene Blue is harmless to young fish and unlike the general belief, it does not affect plants if used in weaker concentration.

About The Author

Nathan Miller

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Water Garden Liners - Which One To Use?

Posted: 20 Mar 2010 07:17 AM PDT

Water Garden Liners - Which One To Use?
by: Doug Green

There are several kinds of pond liners available in pond stores.

The first is EPDM rubber – and this is extremely durable, resists punctures and quite flexible. It is normally sold in 40 or 45 mil thickness. If you intend to put a rock bottom on top of your liner, this is the liner for you as it is very flexible and will give and take with freezing. The puncture resistance and flexibility ensure a long life and consistent performance. Usually guaranteed for over 20 years.

Polyethylene is the cheapest liner you can buy. But with this lowered cost comes a lowered lifespan. If exposed to sunlight – this material may only last one season. It is not puncture resistant and it is quite stiff. The only serious use of this material is if you have a very large pond with a sandy bottom and can bury the edges so the sunlight can't get to it. But if you think you want to build a backyard pond cheaply, using this is truly false economy.

Polypropylene is another choice and it comes in the same thickness as EPDM and is equally puncture resistant. The problem comes in the flexibility (about the same as polyethylene which is to say terrible) and this makes it difficult to go around corners. But it is the strongest of the liners.

Old swimming pool liners make terrible liners as they tend to degrade quickly in the sunlight and are quite stiff.

And what about cheaper materials such as that for roofing. The difference between fish-safe and other material is that the fish safe liners are made with a consistent formula. Other non-fish materials might be OK in this batch but if compound A becomes cheaper next week, it will replace the more expensive compound B. The difficulty is that it doesn't matter for roofing that compound A kills off fish while compound B does not. In fish-safe liners, all material used is consistently fish-safe. But it is possible to obtain a real deal on roof liner material sometimes – just be aware that it may or may not be fish safe.

About The Author

Doug Green, an award winning garden writer with 7 books published answers gardening questions in his free newsletter at

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